Thursday, September 24, 2009

Fall is the Faeries Fault

Not everyone believes in faeries, and that's o.k.. Not everyone believes in taxes. There is something you should know. Fall is not caused solely by weather change. It is caused by pissed off faeries. When the faeries notice that the sun is retreating, they get angry. They are a bit like children. But they are wild and untamable too.






What they do is go around and yank off the leaves in protest. Some like to throw down colorful leaves, some prefer drab. Yank! Toss. Down floats the clueless leaves and clueless clonkers say, "Ahh, isn't fall invigorating, I think I'll go have some hot chocolate"


In my experience, faeries prefer spring and summer. Fall happens, as we discussed, due to repercussions from their leaf tantrums. To faeries, winter is utterly unhelpful. Wet wings. Wet garden parties. Intolerable.





These are some faerie doodles I did by going out in the woods in my leaf suit and sitting quite still. As soon as they realized that I was drawing them, they split.

11 comments:

Martha Brockenbrough said...

Richard, this explains so much!

We are preparing for the return of our house gnome, who likes to cozy up with us in the fall and winter. He makes a mess of the kids' bedroom, or so they tell me...

Katharina said...

Dear Richard,

you have been awarded the Kreative Blogger Award, please come to my blog to pick it up :)

Katy.

Katharina said...

sorry, forgot to mention that your award is on my art blog http://midnightart.blogspot.com
Thanks, Katy.

steven said...

hi richard - it all is so much clearer to me now. i've not had any choice but to believe in the fairies since the first true story teller in my life - my dad's mum - explained why she left a piece of the garden unfinished "for the fairies". i know them as real. so it doesn't surprise me that they chuck their angry hands all about and throw leaves every which way!!! have a peaceful evening. steven

Richard Jesse Watson said...

Hey Martha! Thanks. A house elf? Your kiddos are pretty clever. Did your house elf know Dobby? Poor Dobby. I'm sure you treat the elf tenderly. Ben and I could use a house elf to help on our writing projects. Ahh, it just hit me... that's how you get so much done!

Richard Jesse Watson said...

Katharina, wow! I'm surprised. Thank you so much for the award. I very much enjoyed your blogs. Powerful art and design, stunning photography, and heart-wrenching words.

Richard Jesse Watson said...

I am so glad you mentioned that little secret of leaving some of the garden wild for the fairies. This will solve a lot of problems for me. So *that's* what they've been trying to tell me.

ruthie said...

i shall never look at a fallen leaf in the same way!! i so love your faerie creations, beautiful! guess you had to be quick before they spied you! *ruthie*

Richard Jesse Watson said...

Thank you Ruthie. I did have to tiptoe through the leaves, sit ever so still, and sketch as quick as a bee buzz...

Kitty said...

I had a university lecture the other day about how leaves fall - and faeries were never mentioned! But then, there is a lot that scientists ignore, I find...

In Ireland, farmers often leave faery trees (esp hawthorn and ash) standing in their fields, and just plough around them, no matter what the inconvenience.

Richard Jesse Watson said...

Thank you, Kitty, for telling that about the Irish farmers. you made my day. Scientists have one way of tuning into the mysteries of nature. Poets, musicians, and artists absorb the subtleties of flora and fauna in a non linear fashion. And faeries are on another wave length all together...